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Ragnarök

In Norse mythology, Ragnarök (typically spelt Ragnarǫk in the handwritten scripts) is a series of future events, including a great battle foretold to ultimately result in the death of a number of major figures (including the gods Odin, Thor, Týr, Freyr, Heimdallr, and Loki), the occurrence of various natural disasters, and the subsequent submersion of the world in water. Afterward, the world will resurface anew and fertile, the surviving and reborn gods will meet, and the world will be repopulated by two human survivors. Ragnarök is an important event in the Norse canon, and has been the subject of scholarly discourse and theory.
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Posted by on 01/12/2011 in Prophecies, Ragnarök

 

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Surtr

In Norse mythology, Surtr or Surt (Old Norse “black” or “the swarthy one”) is an eldjötunn.
Surtr is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. In both sources, Surtr is foretold as being a major figure during the events of Ragnarök; carrying his bright sword, he will go to battle against the Æsir, he will do battle with the major god Freyr, and afterward the flames that he brings forth will engulf the Earth.
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Posted by on 01/12/2011 in Prophecies, Ragnarök

 

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Events of Book of Revelation

The Book of Revelation is the final book of the New Testament corpus. The title came into usage from the first word of the book in Koine Greek: apokalupsis, meaning “unveiling” or “revelation” (the author himself not having provided a title). It is also known as the Book of the Revelation of Saint John the Divine or the Apocalypse of John, (both in reference to its author) or the Book of the Revelation of Jesus Christ (in reference to its opening line) or simply Revelation, (often dubbed “Revelations” in contrast to the singular in the original Koine) or the Apocalypse.
The word “apocalypse” is also used for other works of a similar nature in the literary genre of apocalyptic literature. Such literature is “marked by distinctive literary features, particularly prediction of future events and accounts of visionary experiences or journeys to heaven, often involving vivid symbolism.
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Scriptural requirements concerning the Messiah (Judaism and Christianity)

The following is an example of a list of scriptural requirements in Judaism and Christianity concerning the Messiah: his actions, and his reign. Jewish and Christian sources both insist that the Messiah will fulfill all relevant prophecies outright.
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Messiah: Taoism

Li Hong (Chinese: 李弘) is a messianic figure in religious Taoism prophesied to appear at the end of the world cycle to rescue the chosen people, who would be distinguished by certain talismans, practices and virtues. Myths surrounding Li Hong took shape in literature during the Han dynasty. He is depicted in the Daoist scripture Spirit Spells of the Abyss as an ideal leader who would reappear to set right heaven (tian) and earth (dì) at a time of upheaval and chaos.
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Messiah: Zoroastrianism

Saoshyant is a figure of Zoroastrian eschatology who brings about the final renovation of the world, the Frashokereti. The Avestan language name literally means “one who brings benefit,” and is also used as common noun.
In the Gathas, the most sacred hymns of Zoroastrianism and believed to have been composed by Zoroaster (Zarathustra) himself, the term is used to refer to the prophet’s own mission and to his community of followers, who “bring benefit” to humanity. ‘Saoshyant’ may have been a term originally applied to Zoroaster himself.
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Messiah: Christianity

Christianity emerged early in the first century AD as a movement among Jews and their Gentile converts who believed that Jesus was the Messiah. The name “Christian” was first coined by the Jews in Antioch. The Greek word for ‘Messiah’ is khristos (χριστος). Christians commonly refer to Jesus as either the “Christ” or the “Messiah.” In Christian theology the two words are synonymous.
Christians believe Jesus to be the Messiah that Jews were expecting.
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